Tag: nyc (page 1 of 3)

Distinguished Teachers Invited to Apply for Curran Fellowship

Originally published by Dan Pietrafesa on  CNY.org

Vera Parnese is humbled and appreciative to be one of more than 40 distinguished honorees recognized at an Evening of Teacher Recognition and Call to Discernment hosted by the archdiocese’s Superintendent of Schools office at the New York Catholic Center in Manhattan Jan. 24.

The honorees received an invitation to apply for a Curran Fellowship in the Curran Catholic School Leadership Academy, which offers each fellow the opportunity to return to college to study to become a school principal.

“I’ve never considered that type of vocation. For someone to have faith in me that I can fulfill that role and to consider it spiritually is unbelievable to me,” said Ms. Parnese, a teacher at St. Charles School on Staten Island for 17 years who was nominated by her principal, John Kiernan.

“I’ve always been fascinated with learning,” she told CNY. “It’s an ongoing process, and what’s interesting is you’re continually evolving. Growth never stops. It’s a continuous process.”

Teachers and principals mingled for about 30 minutes before going into a conference room to watch an archdiocesan video about serving as a Catholic school principal. They were recognized by Dr. Timothy McNiff, superintendent of schools in the archdiocese, and Steven Virgadamo, an associate superintendent who oversees the leadership academy.

“The best way to find a new principal is right in our own backyard with our good teachers,” Dr. McNiff said. “We want to plant a seed tonight to thank them for what they’re doing, but there are other opportunities and challenges. We’d like them to think about that. This is so important we ask their spouse to come because this is a family decision that we’re asking them to do.”

Virgadamo said the leadership academy and the teacher recognition evening continue to flourish.

“This is our fourth year of doing this. So what we’re starting to see is there are individuals who have been nominated and have gone through the program that are now willing to nominate others,” Virgadamo said.

“Even individuals who don’t go to leadership, this is an opportunity to recognize the teachers in our schools who not only make a contribution every single day to see that young people encounter the risen Christ. They are going above and beyond their classroom duties to make sure the ministry of Catholic education is being fulfilled, not just for their students but their families.”

GinaMarie Fonte, principal of Resurrection School in Rye, was one of the first to go through the leadership program and is now nominating her teachers.

“It’s a wonderful job, and I think that if you have it in your heart to do this job, it’s definitely a calling. If you work hard, you will have a wonderful experience and a wonderful school.”

Jon Frega is a first-year principal of St. Elizabeth School in Manhattan and will begin taking classes as a member of the leadership academy in the fall. He nominated a teacher for the next leadership academy class.

“It’s an amazing opportunity. I’m really excited to go back to school,” he said.

Gillian Burgain and David Ellis have taught a combined 40 years at St. Mark the Evangelist School in Manhattan. Both were honored and invited to apply for a fellowship.

“We love (what we do) and this is what God put us on earth to do,” Ellis said.

Michelle Palmieri has taught at Our Lady Star of the Sea School on Staten Island for 18 years and was nominated by her principal, Jeannine Roland.

“It’s such an honor to be here,” said Ms. Palmieri, the mother of three children. “I’m going to look into the academy, talk about it with my husband and think about our future.

“I love what I do. I go to work happy every morning.”

Pope Francis at World Congress on Catholic Education

Steven Virgadamo shares some of Pope Francis words from an address to the delegates  at the World Congress on Catholic Education held in Rome on November 18-22, 2015.

At the World Congress on Catholic Education, Pope Francis suggested that education cannot be reduced to just the transmission of ideas and that we must find new ways to help young people develop their capacity to think, to make, and to love.

He went on to say……

“A good educator risks teaching his students how to walk on their own.” And…

“You cannot speak of Catholic education without speaking about humanity, because the Catholic identity is precisely that God became man. Educating people in the faith isn’t just about giving catechesis but instead about helping young people to understand reality and discover transcendence. For me, the biggest crisis in education from the Christian perspective is this closing off transcendence. We have closed ourselves to transcendence.

With regard to whom Catholic schools must serve, he said….

 

“The most needy have to experience a rigorous value based education as these children have experienced something better off kids haven’t: suffering. They have something that youths in more rich neighborhoods don’t have. It isn’t their fault. It’s a sociological reality. They have the experience of survival, and also of cruelty, and also of hunger, and also of injustice. Their humanity is wounded. The reality is you understand better from the peripheries than from the center, because in the center you are always covered, you’re always defended.”

Thank you for reading!

Steve Virgadamo

Royal Palm Academy

Royal-Palm AcademySteven Virgadamo has been retained to conduct a search for the next Head of School/President for Royal Palm Academy in Naples Florida. Interested candidates should see the position profile below.

THE POSITION

At Royal Palm Academy, students don’t just walk from the drop off line to enter school – they run.  Students from PreK through grade eight are eager to come to Royal Palm Academy, where they know that teachers listen to and cherish them for who they are and who they want to become. Anchored by the Catholic values that inspired its founding, the school provides a nurturing environment that strives to educate the whole child: spiritually, academically, socially, and physically.

Through small classes and differentiated instruction, teachers – many of whom hold advanced degrees-meet the needs of each and every student.

At this time, the school seeks a new Head, effective July 1, 2016 to lead with grace and vision. The successful candidate will be a capable and proven leader who is passionate about education of the whole-child and committed to leading a community of elementary and middle school-aged students.

SCHOOL HISTORY

Since its inception, Royal Palm Academy has been committed to partnering with families in the total education and formation of their child(ren). This tradition has become an essential part of the school’s culture. RPA is fully accredited PreK-8 by:

  • Florida Catholic Conference
  • Florida Council of Independent Schools
  • Florida Kindergarten Council
  • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
  • National Association of Independent Schools

THE SCHOOL

 Royal Palm Academy offers students boundless opportunities to explore their interests and passions.  Differentiated curricula at all grade levels challenge and support students in all their endeavors.  By the time they graduate, students have developed a solid academic foundation, independence, and the critical and creative thinking skills to not just attend, but to excel at the best high schools in the community.

ACADEMICS

Royal Palm Academy equips students to succeed in life through as comprehensive method of education that fosters excellence in four key areas of leadership:

  • Intellectual
  • Human Character
  • Spiritual
  • Apostolic

RPA students consistently score in the top 15% nationwide in the Stanford 10

As part of its mission to educate the whole child, Royal Palm Academy provides a comprehensive enrichment programs, offering opportunities for students to explore the visual and performing arts, Spanish language and culture, and athletics and movement.

Art classes allow students to express creativity and innovation.  They develop a wide range of fine motor skills through projects designed to help them discover the intersection of art and all their other subjects.  Using two-and three-dimensional media, students explore the visual world.

Through a focus on the performing arts, students gain comfort with public speaking and performance.

Students are introduced to another culture and language through Spanish instruction at Royal Academy. In the lower school, students’ interaction with Spanish is introductory, through song and movement.  A focus on vocabulary and grammar enhances their understanding of and facility with the language in the upper school.

Students hone their physical abilities, motor skills, and general through frequent athletic opportunities.  In the lower school, students take movement class and can play various club sports. Students continue to grow athletically in upper school through weekly physical education classes and the opportunity to compete in interscholastic sports.

NAPLES, FLORIDA

Royal Palm’s enviable location in Naples, Florida provides easy access to full range of recreational and educational resources.  Naples is a city on the Gulf of Mexico in southwest Florida that’s known for high-end shopping and golf courses.

OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

The Next Head of Royal Palm Academy School will find a school on the move.  Over the past few years the enrollment has grown, a capital campaign completed and a gymnasium constructed. The Leadership Board is eager to continue that growth.  The school’s reputation has grown as well, and it now draws an increasingly geographically wider population of parents and students.

The parents at Royal Palm Academy are very involved in the school and very positive about its direction.  They provide significant volunteer services and serve on the governing boards and the Search Committee. They also speak highly on the Catholic education their children receive and value the dedication of the teaching staff. The next Head will need to continue to support the Catholic mission of the school, both as the lead administrator and through her/her life as a model to students.

Projects that lie ahead for the new Head of School will include working on the facilities needs of the school and increasing enrollment

QUALIFICATIONS AND QUALITIES OF THE NEXT HEAD OF SCHOOL

The next Head of Royal Palm Academy will need to:

  • Be a Catholic in good standing;
  • Be an experienced, resourceful Catholic educational leader with proven motivational and leadership and institutional advancement abilities;
  • Be a listener, collaborator, and communicator with all constituents;
  • Love children and life in schools;
  • Understand the particular challenges of leading a Catholic school;
  • Maintain close relations with the diocese and participate in Catholic educational programs;
  • Be skillful in setting out a vision for the school’s next phase of development;
  • Be eager to work closely with involved parents.

TO APPLY

Interested candidates should submit the following materials confidentially as separate PDF attachments in one email to: svirgadamo@msn.com

  • Cover letter expressing interest in the Royal Palm Academy – Head of School position
  • Current resume
  • Statement  of  Catholic educational philosophy and practice
  • List of five references with name, phone number, and email address of each (references will be contacted only with the candidate’s permission).

So We Have a Catholic School Board – Who Does What Around Here Anyway?

catholic-school-boardFor most Catholic schools, the school Board exists primarily to formulate policy and give strategic direction to the school (i.e., plan).

The Board is charged with furthering the school’s mission and ensuring the school’s success. The Board’s core activity is planning, and the Board’s primary constituency is not today’s students but the students of the future.  

The minimal functions of a Catholic school Board includes:

 

1. Developing a strategic plan

2. Policy development

3. Hiring the chief administrator

4. Approving an annual budget

5. Overseeing financial accountability including establishing just compensation and tuition pricing.

6. Ensuring that in broad terms the school is fulfilling its mission.

 

The Board members should NOT be involved in the day-to-day operations of the school. Such daily practical matters should be handled directly by the Chief Administrator of the school. The primary responsibility of the chief administrator is to:

 

· Implement the policies established by the board.

· Oversee the implementation of the curriculum and classroom management.

· Evaluate, hire and fire staff within the financial constraints determined by the Board.

 

 The critical distinction between the roles of the Board and the Chief Administrator is that the Board controls the big picture and gives direction to the Chief Administrator, who implements policy with considerable discretion. The Board is responsible for approving the annual budget, for developing a long-term strategic plan, and for the evaluation and the hiring and firing the Head of the school. The school Head handles the day-to-day operations of the school, typically without any Board intervention or input. 

 

About the Author – Steven Virgadamo

Steve Virgadamo provides thought leadership to Church leaders, Trustees and Board members. His expert counsel over many years has led to many Bishops, Chief Finance Officers, Superintendents, Pastors and Principals to consider him to be the expert in both Church and school management and the most premier consultant for Catholic schools, colleges and universities. He travels throughout the United States and internationally to mentor and teach school leaders, teachers, pastors, and more. His domestic and international reputation has led to Steven’s selection as a delegate for the World Congress on Catholic Education sponsored by the Congregation of Catholic Education.

Thank you for reading!

Steve Virgadamo

Catholic Schools are both good for America and the Catholic Church

catholic-usAfter 30 plus years of working with Catholic schools throughout the United States I have an understanding and appreciation of the long history of support by the Catholic faithful for the  Catholic education for young people.

On average, American Catholics have had about eight years of education in Catholic schools. Half have attended a Catholic elementary school, about three in 10 have attended a Catholic high school, and just over one in 10 have attended a Catholic college or university.  The evidence suggests that the total number of years of education in Catholic schools is positively correlated with achieving a higher level of education and thus also achieving a higher household income.

In general, the strongest effects of Catholic education among those who attended Catholic schools, particularly as they affect measures of attachment to the church. According to the research available, those who attended a Catholic school are more likely than those who did not to attend mass and engage in parish life.

Catholic schooling pays off in a number of ways for the Church and our country in that attending a Catholic school  leads to a higher level educational attainment and  subsequently a higher household income. In addition, Catholics who attended a Catholic high school appear to have a stronger attachment to the church on some measures. They are somewhat more satisfied with the church as it exists today and more accepting of some of the measures many dioceses are adopting to address the shortage of priests.

Thank you for viewing!

Steve Virgadamo

The Pope Visited a Catholic School

Perhaps you should as well. You’ll find that that the school is still Our Father’s school, but not your father’s Catholic School anymore.

pope-francis

While many Catholic schools have closed, more than 150 schools opened during the past 10 years. Hardly a diocese in the country exists that does not have plans on the drawing boards for new schools and additions to others. Catholic parents in suburban parishes are now the prime movers behind the opening of new schools. From California to Virginia, from Florida to Indiana, examples exist of new schools opening with capacity enrollments and waiting lists.

The best way to understand what is happening in Catholic schools is to take a good look at the following four traits:

1. ADHERENCE TO CATHOLIC IDENTITY

2. MODERN CLASSROOM ARRANGEMENTS

3. NEW ADMINISTRATIVE SETUP

4. CHANGES IN FUNDING

CATHOLIC SCHOOLS…

1) Have a proven record of academic excellence;

2) Recognize you as the primary educator of your child(ren) and partner with you for the good of your children;

3) Continue the religious formation of your children begun in your home;

4) Offer a rigorous curriculum

5) Provide a challenging environment;

6) Maintain a secure environment;

7) Deal with the issues of today and show students the application of Christian principles to them;

8) Have educators who believe that all children can succeed;

9) Provide a Christian value-centered education; and most importantly

10) Prepare students for not just college, but heaven too!

If you are not a parent but a Catholic parishioner, I ask you to examine with me the following reasons for helping the renaissance of Catholic schools throughout the United States: 1. At Baptism we joined the family of God and were charged to become evangelizers. We do this chiefly by acting in a Christ like manner. Because we are charged to be evangelizers, we need to assist those who do this on a full-time basis. We need to support our Catholic schools.

2. Catholic schools are good for America. Large numbers of Catholic schools provide a top-quality education to very poor children thereby treating the disease of poverty and social injustice as opposed to just the symptoms.

Catholic schools have done more for evangelization than any other American Church institution. For more than 200 years, they have been the most effective means of helping youth grow in their faith. Catholic schools have been a great gift to the nation. They have educated millions and millions of students who became productive citizens intensely loyal to their country.

Thank you for reading!

Steve Virgadamo

11 Things for Every Catholic School Leader to Consider During October

catholic-leader

In this article Steven Virgadamo, a renowned expert in Catholic School Leadership shares some October wisdom with Catholic School Leaders.

Looks like you made it!

October 1 – first month of your Apostolic work as a Catholic School Leader is in the history books. Congratulations!

 

 

To help you prepare for your next month in your leadership ministry Steven Virgadamo shares a few insights for new and experienced Catholic school leaders:

1. Continue to listen carefully to the staff- the faculty, lunch staff and custodians. We are larger than the sum of our parts! More often than not the faculty, staff and custodians have a pulse and perspective on what is working and of course what is not,”

2. Continue to honor the history of the school, and avoid using words like at another school I worked…”

3. By now, you have good read on your faculty and have identified teachers who have a passion for knowledge and “upping their game”. Encourage them to take measured risks and support them as they will help those more fearful of change to adjust to new pedagogies.

4. Relationships matter. Focus on building community and never ever forget to admit when you are wrong or hold your ground when it is right for the children to do so.

5. Research indicates a direct link between classroom management and academic success. Never stop practicing MBWA (Management by Walking Around), be visible in the hallways, dining facilities, playground and of course a mentor to new teachers.

6. Keep your eye on the goal – the  SMART Goals and be prepared to measure the effectiveness of your year in relationship to the goals.

7. Test scores, test scores, test scores…be creative and innovative, work with teachers to conduct formal and informal student assessments in all academic disciplines but particularly focused on increasing students performance in Math and ELA.

8. Model behaviors and be sure your staff perceives you as a lifelong learner. Staff meetings should be professional development opportunities not just informational monologues

9. As you gather with the students and parents for first Friday liturgy, remind them that this is a school and Church built by God, it is HIS House and the more time that they spend in it and get to know Him and love Him the happier they will be.”

10. Remember to manage up – as well as down –  Keep your Pastor, Board, and  Superintendent in the loop. Each is a great resource. Consult with them regularly and be sure to share both triumphs and tribulations.

11. Keep a professional journal. It will be a great resource for you and will empower your growth as a school leader in service to the Church.

And lastly, but perhaps most importantly, make memories and be joyful as you are a important partner in Our Father’s business.

Thank you for reading!

Steve Virgadamo

Catholic School Leaders and Boards – Who runs the school?

archdiocese-nycAs I work with Catholic Schools throughout the United States I am frequently presented with scenarios of conflict between school leaders and board members.  The dysfunction in such a relationship can be destructive to the Faith community we call the Catholic school. In the article below, I attempt to articulate the primary roles, responsibilities and focus of the Chief administrator of a Catholic School, or a Catholic School system and the Governing Board. It is my hope that it will be used widely to clarify roles and responsibilities before the scenarios of conflict emerge.

For most Catholic schools, the school Board exists primarily to formulate policy and give strategic direction to the school (i.e., plan). The Board is charged with furthering the school’s mission and ensuring the school’s success. The Board’s core activity is planning, and the Board’s primary constituency is not today’s students but the students of the future.

The 8 minimal functions of a Catholic school Board includes:

1. Developing a strategic plan

 2. Policy development

3. Hiring the chief administrator

 4. Approving an annual budget

5. Overseeing financial accountability

6. Establishing just compensation for employees

7. Set tuition

8. Ensuring that in broad terms the school is fulfilling its mission.

 

Thank you for reading!

Steve Virgadamo

Eight things Catholic School Board Members Should Do

catholic-nycFor most Catholic schools, the school Board exists primarily to formulate policy and give strategic direction to the school (i.e., plan). The Board is charged with furthering the school’s mission and ensuring the school’s success. The Board’s core activity is planning, and the Board’s primary constituency is not today’s students but the students of the future.

The minimal functions of a Catholic school Board includes:

1. Developing a strategic plan

 2. Policy development

3. Hiring the chief administrator

 4. Approving an annual budget

5. Overseeing financial accountability including establishing just compensation and tuition pricing

6. Ensuring that in broad terms the school is fulfilling its mission

The Board members should NOT be involved in the day-to-day operations of the school. Such daily practical matters should be handled directly by the Chief Administrator of the school. The primary responsibility of the chief administrator is to:

  • Implement the policies established by the board.
  • Oversee the implementation of the curriculum and classroom management.
  • Evaluate, hire and fire staff within the financial constraints determined by the Board.

The critical distinction between the roles of the Board and the Chief Administrator is that the Board controls the big picture and gives direction to the Chief Administrator, who implements policy with considerable discretion. The Board is responsible for approving the annual budget, for developing a long-term strategic plan, and for the evaluation and the hiring and firing the Head of the school. The school Head handles the day-to-day operations of the school, typically without any Board intervention or input.

Thank you for reading!

Steve Virgadamo

Reimagining Catholic Schools to Strengthen Mission and Evangelization

pope-francis

Pope Francis

“We are living in an information-driven society which bombards us indiscriminately with data—all treated as being of equal importance—and which leads to remarkable superficiality in the area of moral discernment. In response, we need to provide an education which teaches critical thinking and encourages the development of mature moral values”

Pope Francis, excerpt from Evangelii Gaudium, November 24, 2013

It is the religious character, identity and culture that distinguishes Catholic schools and allows them to be successful. In order to strengthen our mission and continue to evangelize, we need all Catholic schools to be exemplary. The challenges of our society mandate the need for true Catholic schools, not simply schools operated by Catholics.

In the past, religious sisters, brothers and priests staffed Catholic schools, establishing and sustaining their Catholic culture. As we continue to face many challenges, I believe the blueprint has been laid out, the foundation is in place and with proper leadership; success will be inevitable.

In the National Standards and Benchmarks for Effective Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools, defining characteristics of Catholic schools have been mapped out as a concrete guide for continued growth and improvement. Focusing on the standards of: Mission and Catholic Identity, Governance and Leadership, Academic Excellence and Operational Vitality, these standards truly define what we need in order to remain vital.

Vast changes have swept across the societal and educational landscape.  How we respond to these changes will affect the future of Catholic education. Using the standards and benchmarks as a template we can address our future with tools which will allow success to flourish. Attention to developing the whole child, fostering parish and school relationships, and supporting families are all integral components to accomplish a re-imagined mission and the job of evangelization.

As a leader, the need for a well-articulated execution of mission and evangelization will allow for enhanced confidence from our current constituents, allow opportunities to build community, welcome new families and complement to true mission of our Catholic schools.

The Bishops of the United States are deeply committed to Catholic schools and clearly understand our need to be more aggressive in supporting this important mission in the Church especially in our increasingly secular and materialistic society where the public education system has basically removed any mention of God or prayer from its schools and its classrooms. As President of the Bishop’s Conference, Cardinal Dolan asked that the Conference focus more attention on the situation of our Catholic schools and increase its efforts in articulating more clearly the importance of the work of education in the mission of the Church and make the agenda on Catholic schools as much a priority as the Bishops stance on pro-life and immigration.

One of the challenges that we face is the increasing financial burden of running a Catholic school. This is an issue that will require great resolve on the part of those involved in this ministry of Catholic education. The Catholic Community not only has the ability but also the means to ensure the existence of our Catholic schools far into the future. Today, the Archdiocese of New York today announced the launch of Inner-City Scholarship Fund’s $125 million “Kids Are Our Capital” endowment campaign led by a record-setting founding gift of $40 million from Christine and Stephen A. Schwarzman.  The Schwarzmans’ gift is the single largest donation in the Archdiocese’s 207 year history.

However, if this level of philanthropy is to become more routine, it is incumbent that we as school leaders take a hard look at how our schools are run and operated. We need to re-educate the Catholic community as to the importance of these schools in the mission and work of the Church. We must do so without hesitation or timidity and without being nostalgic in terms of what was in the past, but rather address what is needed for their future success.

In its document entitled “The Catholic School” the Sacred Congregation for Catholic Education in 1977 pointed out that the Church establishes schools because she considers them as a privileged means of promoting the formation of the whole person, since the school is a center in which a specific concept of the world, of man, and of history is developed and conveyed. (The Catholic School-Scared Congregation for Catholic Education 1977) This definition of the role of Catholic schools as the place where formation of the whole person takes place is something that we need to understand more fully and to express more effectively in marketing and promoting our schools.

At the same time we must see the schools within the context of the mission of the Church – the Church has a mission and therefore, we have schools. It should be understood clearly that the reason we establish, support and maintain Catholic schools is because we believe the truth about life, the truth about the origin, identity and destiny of every human person is rooted in our understanding of the person of Jesus Christ.

It is important that Catholic schools not be portrayed simply as competitors to the government run school system, nor should our efforts be seen as a lack of support for the public education system. The reality is that we need to support every effort to help all children achieve their God-given potential and to become esteemed members of the human family based on their human dignity as children made in the image and likeness of God. The public schools are not our competition and the product we strive to produce is more than simply a literate person who can achieve economic success. Our goal must be to prepare students not just for college, but heaven as well.

If we are to seek and expect unprecedented philanthropic support so that Catholic schools prosper then we must re-evaluate many of the structures and resources that helped in the past, discard what is no longer relevant in the current milieu and put in place the foundation stones that will carry us through to the future.

A crucial element of this is leadership. This is perhaps the most important challenge to the survival of the Catholic Schools. We need to develop, form and train individuals who can guide our schools into the future. The leaders must be totally committed to the mission of Catholic education. They must be faith-filled people who daily practice their faith and will be true role models for the staff and students they will encounter on a daily basis. They must have a passion for the work that needs to be done and a willingness to work to achieve the goals that are put forth. These individuals must embody and live the Catholic identity that we proclaim and be examples of individuals who, with God’s grace, have become true disciples of the Lord.

As a result of an early retirement option, the New York Archdiocese has 42 new school leaders this year – 42 transformational leaders. More than 200 applications from across the United States were received. Many candidates expressed a desire to be a part of the Catholic school leadership team who rewrites the script of Catholic schools from a declining system to one which is growing, flourishing and philanthropically endowed.

From 1920 to 2015 the number of Catholics in the United States increased by 28%. One would think this an asset for Catholic schools. Yet under the watch of the Catholic school leaders of the baby boomer generation,  the number of children enrolled in Catholic schools declined year after year. To paraphrase JFK’s inaugural address – Let it be known from this day forth to friend and foe alike that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Catholic school leaders. Born in the latter half of the last century, educated in a post Vatican II church, hardened by scandal and committed to reestablishing a Catholic school culture which provides opportunities for students to encounter the risen Christ while challenged in a rigorous academic environment and empowered to develop the gifts given to them by God.

About the Author – Steven Virgadamo

Steve Virgadamo provides thought leadership to Church leaders, Trustees and Board members. His expert counsel over many years has led to many Bishops, Chief Finance Officers, Superintendents, Pastors and Principals to consider him to be the expert in both Church and school management and the most premier consultant for Catholic schools, colleges and universities. He travels throughout the United States and internationally to mentor and teach school leaders, teachers, pastors, and more. His domestic and international reputation has led to Steven’s selection as a delegate for the World Congress on Catholic Education sponsored by the Congregation of Catholic Education.

Thank you for reading!

Steve Virgadamo